B. Washington Writes

Hi! My name is Brittany. I write fiction and poetry. I'll be documenting the editing process of my first novel, offering writing tips and prompts, and of course writing about books! (Psalm 45:1)

I really wanted to write about Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri for Fiction Monday, but I didn’t carve out enough time this weekend or today to write it the proper post it deserves. So this is a less detailed way of saying, “check out the book!” 

Lahiri also has a newer book that came out last year called “The Lowland.” I’ve been meaning to look that up as well.

I think I’ll write a proper Fiction Monday post and share that next Monday. Hold me to it, folks!

Friendly reminder that anyone born between 1985-1998 didn’t get their hogwarts letter because Voldemort’s ministry wiped out the record of muggleborns

(Source: tracey-hummel, via iprefertoread)

“I would advise anyone who aspires to a writing career that before developing his talent he would be wise to develop a thick hide.”

—   Harper Lee (via maxkirin)

hope-in-every-book:

svyalitchat:

The #SVYALit Project: Using YA Lit to talk about sexual violence and consent in the lives of teens. Here are a few book lists and book reviews.

Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  
Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)
Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys  
Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely 
Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian 
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton 
Plus One by Elizabeth Fama
September Girls by Bennett Madison  
Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien
5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Charm and Strange by Stephanie Khuen
The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu
The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski
Uses for Boys by Erica Loraine Scheidt
Killer Instinct by S. E. Green

Live Through This by Mindi Scott

Sex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s List

See the complete #SVYALit Project Index Here: http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/02/svyalit-project-index.html

This is important. Could very well help those struggling to read these books. Don’t leave anyone in the dark.

(via brandycolbert)

When I read my own writing and by some miracle it sounds decent

title2come:

image

Submitted by thewriterschoppingblock 

(via imstephenkingoftheworld)

knitmeapony:

bisexual-books:

We (Ellie and Sarah) were in Chicago today and this was the main window display at Women and Children First, the feminist book store.  
On the cardboard where it says “Rest In Power” are the names of murdered black people, from Mike Brown to Islan Nettles to ‘my friend’s student’.    To the left two signs read “Injustice is a Feminist Issue” and “Ferguson is a Feminist Issue”.   On the right a sign says “The idea that some lives matter LESS is the root of all that is wrong in the world”.  Below is a selection of books on African American issues or by African American authors, focusing on feminist, womanist, and LGBT themes.  
Across the bottom is a quote by bisexual African Caribbean-American poet and author June Jordan (that’s her yellow book to the left called Some Of Us Did Not Die, which is amazing btw).  The quote reads:

"And what shall we do, we who did not die?  What shall we do now?  How shall we grieve, and cry out loud, and face down despair?  Is there an honorable, non-violent means towards mourning and remembering who and what we loved?"


I love this store so much.

knitmeapony:

bisexual-books:

We (Ellie and Sarah) were in Chicago today and this was the main window display at Women and Children First, the feminist book store.  

On the cardboard where it says “Rest In Power” are the names of murdered black people, from Mike Brown to Islan Nettles to ‘my friend’s student’.    To the left two signs read “Injustice is a Feminist Issue” and “Ferguson is a Feminist Issue”.   On the right a sign says “The idea that some lives matter LESS is the root of all that is wrong in the world”.  Below is a selection of books on African American issues or by African American authors, focusing on feminist, womanist, and LGBT themes.  

Across the bottom is a quote by bisexual African Caribbean-American poet and author June Jordan (that’s her yellow book to the left called Some Of Us Did Not Die, which is amazing btw).  The quote reads:

"And what shall we do, we who did not die?  What shall we do now?  How shall we grieve, and cry out loud, and face down despair?  Is there an honorable, non-violent means towards mourning and remembering who and what we loved?"

I love this store so much.

(via pagesofmemories)

pridefulvanity:

I hope my dark skin offends you. I hope pronouncing my name forces you to twist your tongue in ways you never imagined. I hope me speaking loudly to my parents in our language hurts your ears. I hope our fragrant food burns your nose. I am not here for you.

We are not here for you.

(Source: la-rinascente, via poetryaboutmilkduds)

thegeekery:

Tardis in progress #tardis #doctorwho #makerbot #3dprinter by laurenpaulrose http://ift.tt/1rUKJN6

thegeekery:

Tardis in progress #tardis #doctorwho #makerbot #3dprinter by laurenpaulrose http://ift.tt/1rUKJN6

(via doctorwho)

Glimmer Train Literary Journal Opens for Unsolicited Short Stories - Pays $700/story

writingcareer:

image

Quarterly literary journal Glimmer Train (est. 1990) is now open for standard submissions of creative short stories. During this period, the journal does not charge a reading fee. Editors and founders Linda-Swanson Davies and Susan Burmeister-Brown encourage unsolicited stories from emerging writers. Part of Glimmer Train’s mission is to discover, publish and support underrepresented writers of extraordinary talent.

Read More

(via thewritingcafe)